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Region of Queens Municipality

Nova Scotia, Canada

The hike to the coast (no biking) is well worth the effort, as you will be rewarded with the sight and sounds of seals just off the shore and the bluest waters you will have ever seen. The white sands and rugged rocks are a popular haven for migrating shorebirds and the endangered piping plover. For more information on Keji Seaside, visit their site.  There are two trails at Keji Seaside.  The shoreline is a 45-60 minute walk from the parking lot (but well worth it!).

Harbour Rocks Trail
This trail passes through mixed conifer, birch, and maple forests. As you near the coast, the forest changes to mainly spruce and fir. The trail emerges into a dense tundra like cover of alder and sheep laurel just before you start to hear the breaking waves on the sandy beaches that await. The Harbour Rocks Trail follows the coastline to the western end of St. Catherines River beach. Expect to see large numbers of harbour seals lying on the rocks just off shore. Don't forget your binoculars as this is a prime bird watching location. Reminders of long forgotten farmers and families are evident in the stone fences, rock foundations, old clearings, and cattle trails that still seem to be calling to those who venture close. The endangered Piping Plover call two thirds of St. Catherine's Beach home from late April to mid August so watch for the posted signs that are a reminder to keep your distance. The trail is gravel and varies in width but is generally wide enough for two people to walk side by side. Well maintained with boardwalks over most wet areas.

Port Joli Head Trail
This trail branches away from the Harbour Rocks Trail and crosses the extensive bog by way of a long winding boardwalk. Let the scent of the juniper that grows along the boardwalk tickle your senses. You will stroll alongside small areas of predominately soft wood forest which hugs the coastline until you reach Port Joli Head. You will then wind your way along the shoreline to picturesque Harbour Rocks. The trail then follows the rugged coast past Isaac's Harbour, MacLeod's Cove & Boyd's Cove. You are bound to hear seals calling from their sunning rocks as they bask and play the day away. Keep an eye open for cormorants drying their wings on the rocks just off shore, a perfect photo opportunity for sure. Shore birds are in abundance along the white sand beaches. Sandpipers, yellowlegs and piping plovers are just a few that call St. Catherine's River Beach home. The trail is gravel and varies in width but is generally wide enough for two people to walk side by side. Well maintained with boardwalks over most wet areas.

Location: Port Joli.

Trailhead: Drive west along Highway 103 toward Yarmouth, take Exit 22.  Turn left on St Catherine's River Road, and travel 6km to the park entrance.  GPS (parking lot): 43.838280, -64.856291

Significant Features: Seal and seabird watching, endangered piping plover nesting area, home of the pitcher plant, mixed forest habitat, rugged coastline.

Trail Length:  Habour Rocks: 5.2km return.  Port Joli Head: 8.7km return.

Hiking Time: Harbour Rocks: 1 hour 45 minutes.  Port Joli Head: 3 hours.

Ability Level: Habour Rocks: very few slight and moderate slopes, all skill levels.  Port Joli Head:  elevations and footings vary, for the active hiker.

For your comfort and safety: Dogs are required to be on a leash at all times and you must pick up after them. Stay on designated trails. A hat and sunscreen are strongly recommended. Swimming is not recommended as the water is extremely cold and dangerous currents and undertows may occur. There are no lifeguards on duty. Use caution on rocky headlands. Unusually large waves can occur and are often unexpected. Approaching seals on the beach is dangerous. Black bears are present, although seldom seen. Please respect all wild animals by viewing them from a distance. Remember to wear appropriate clothing and footwear for the weather conditions. Carry bug repellent. Plenty of water for drinking on hot days is a must. There is no scheduled winter maintenance. Pack in pack out.

Visitor Services: Between mid June and mid October the Kiosk is open at the trailhead. There is park and trail information available during that time. Washroom facilities, a tap for water, and beverage machines are available at the trailhead when the kiosk is open. Bike racks are available at the trailhead year round. Washroom facilities are available on the trails year round. Viewing stations and interpretive panels are available along the trails. 

 

About an hour north of Liverpool, and twenty minutes north of Caledonia, sits 381 square kilometers of protected forest called "Keji" by locals. Kejimkujik National Park and National Historic Site is a outdoor enthusiast's dream, with endless hiking and biking trails giving you views of amazing wildlife and rare species. A popular choice is the Hemlocks and Hardwoods Hike, taking you past majestic Hemlocks, some several hundred years old. For a map of the hiking trails, visit Keji's website.

GPS – Keji Visitor Centre: 44.438667, -65.208449

Keji is located on Highway 8, about 20 minutes north of Caledonia.

 

 

Thomas Raddall Provincial Park covers 1,675 acres and is home to an interesting range of habitats. The wooded areas are home to many songbirds, osprey, eagles, deer, snowshoe hares, while the lakes and streams offer mink, otter and beaver. Particularly beautiful in the Fall. In addition to the walking and bicycle trails, the Park offers wooded campsites.

Port Joli Trail (2.2 km return – ¾ hour – all skill levels – walking/hiking)
This is an easy hiking trail that follows the winding pebbled shoreline through stands of white spruce and balsam fir. Both white sand and rock beaches are in abundance amongst large boulders all along the shoreline. Across the bay, Kejimkujik National Park Seaside is visible from a number of observation points.

Sandy Bay Trail (1.4 km return – ½ hour – all skill levels - walking/hiking)
This trail is an extension of the multi-use trail leading to Sandy Bay Beach. Follow the shoreline through stands of white spruce that will eventually lead you back to the MacDonald House. Archaeologists have found old cellars, a well, and many stone walls from early homesteads along this trail. Rest for a moment at the long forgotten site of the lobster cannery and skid way. This area was once home to a thriving fishery. It is common to see seals and sea ducks just offshore.

Coastal Hardwood Ridge Trail (2.6 km return – 1 hr - all skill levels - walking/hiking)
This is a scenic coastal trail that meanders through a mixed forest of maple, spruce, and balsam fir until you reach a sheltered beach on the shore of Port Joli Bay.

Herring Rock Trail (1.0 km – ½ hour – all skill levels – walking/hiking)
This is a short shoreline trail that follows the coast along a headland that overlooks sheltered coves and Port Joli Bay. Still visible along the shoreline are the remnants of an old fish storehouse, camp, and wharf pilings that will remind you that this area was once part of a thriving inshore fishery.

Moody Barrens Trail (4 km return – 1 ½ hours – all skill levels – walking/hiking)
This trail leads northward to Moody Barrens and then eastward past the southern tip of Moody Bog where it then connects to the Coastal Hardwood Ridge Trail.

Historic Port Joli Road (2 km return – ¾ hour – all skill levels - walking/hiking/bicycling)
This trail will lead you from the campground southward to Cove Lake where the day use area of the park is located. The trail returns northward to the park office and then back along the road to the trailhead.

Location: Port L'Hebert.

Contact: 902-683-2664

Dates & Rates: Open Victoria Day weekend to Thanksgiving Day weekend.  No fee for day use.

Directions: Drive west along Hwy 103 toward Yarmouth, taking Exit 22. Turn left on the Port L'Hebert Road and travel 8km to the park entrance.  GPS (Park Visitor Centre): 43.834366, -64.892220

For your comfort and safety: Comfortable hiking boots or other sturdy footwear is recommended. Tell someone where you are going and when you expect to return. Remain on the established trails and obey all signs. Carry a first aid kit. Animals must be leashed at all times and cleaned up after. Dress for the weather. Carry bug repellent, sunscreen, and drinking water. Pack in pack out.

Visitor Services: The office kiosk is open from Victoria Day weekend to Thanksgiving weekend.  There are trail maps and park information available at the kiosk.  Camping is available for a fee.  Please check at the kiosk for availability.  There are picnic tables, firepits, and washroom facilities available at the day use parking area.

 

 

The Trestle Trail Bridge Is Closed to All Users

The Trestle Trail Bridge has been closed to all users effective immediately. The engineering firm of AMEC Americas Ltd. was contracted to conduct an inspection and provide a report assessing the structural integrity of the Trestle Trail Bridge; the report submitted on Nov. 24 recommended that "pedestrian and all types of vehicles be prevented from using the bridge ... until further detailed investigation and engineering analysis be completed." The report stated the concrete foundation of the bridge spanning the Mersey River in Liverpool has experienced severe deterioration which now threatens its safety.

Council has authorized the immediate closure of the bridge, and has directed staff to investigate potential options and the magnitude of costs of further studies.

The wooded section of the trail will continue to be open to all users, however the bridge crossing the Mersey River is closed until further notice.

This is a beautiful community walking trail. A former section of rail line, the Trestle Trail meanders along the Mersey River and through the picturesque town of Liverpool. The surface is well packed and it is a wide trail. There are fantastic river views in both directions.

Location:  Liverpool.

Trailhead: Take exit 19 off Highway 103 to Liverpool.  Vehicles can be parked at the Circle K Gas Station.  GPS (Bristol entrance): 44.045456, -64.722002.  

Significant Feature: Beautiful views of the Mersey River.

Trail Length: 1.2km 

Hiking Time: 20 mins

Ability Level:  Level trail is suitable for all skill levels.

For your comfort and safety: Wear appropriate clothing and footwear for the weather conditions.  Please note that the trail is not cleared in winter so ice may be a concern.  Please stay on the trail path and leave only footprints.  Pets should remain on a leash and bags are supplied at each trailhead so you can pick up after your dogs.  

Visitor Services:   Year round washrooms are available at the Circle K Gas Station. 

 

 

In 1987, the Bowater Mersey Paper Company established a 54 acre community park at Pine Grove in recognition of Queens County's designation as the Forestry Capital of Canada for that year. Walking trails are gravel and vary in width. Watch for tree roots on trail surfaces. The trails connect major points of interest to the scenic picnic area overlooking the Mersey River. At the picnic area you will find picnic tables, a fireplace, and an artesian well. Families and groups often gather here. The marshy cove area in the park has been designated as a duck breeding and resting area in cooperation with Ducks Unlimited.

Location: Milton.

Trailhead: Take exit 19 off of Highway 103.  Turn right on Highway 8.  The park is on the left hand side of the road.  GPS: 44.048864, -64.731531

Significant Features: Breeding, feeding, and resting site for black ducks and teal.  Spectacular rhododendron and azalea gardens, stunning views of the Mersey River.

Trail Length: 1.6km with a multitude of loops within the Park.

Hiking Time: 1 hour

Ability Level: Trail elevations vary with moderate slopes and some stairs depending on the chosen loop.  All skill levels.

For your comfort and safety: Wear appropriate clothing and footwear for the weather conditions. Please note that the trail is not cleared in winter so ice may be a concern. Please stay on the trail path, especially during duck breeding season, and leave only footprints. Do not approach, disturb, or feed any wildlife you may encounter.  Pets should remain on a leash and it is asked that you pick up after your dogs.  Please do not pick the flowers.  

Visitor Services: Washroom facilities are available at the trail head.  There is a picnic area with fireplace (please respect any fire bans that may be in effect).  There is a swimming beach available, however no lifeguard is on duty. Click here for a map of the Park trails.

 

 

Queens is rich with trails well suited for hikers and bicyclists. Offering year-round experiences, our pathways cover some of the most beautiful and enriching parts of the Province. We have assembled just a sampling of all the routes that are available in Queens.

Subcategories

Thomas Raddall Provincial Park covers 1,675 acres and is home to an interesting range of habitats. The wooded areas are home to many songbirds, osprey, eagles, deer, snowshoe hares, while the lakes and streams offer mink, otter and beaver. Particularly beautiful in the Fall. In addition to the walking and bicycle trails, the Park offers wooded campsites. The list of trails and their descriptions is found below.

Location:  Port L'Hebert.

Directions:  Drive west along Hwy 103 toward Yarmouth. Approximately 29km from Liverpool, there will be signage for the park on the left hand side of the road. Turn left on the Port L'Hebert Road and travel 8km to the park entrance. GPS Coordinates: 43.84462, -64.91958

Dates and rates:  Victoria Day Weekend to Thanksgiving Weekend, No Fee for Day Use

Contact: 902-683-2664

For your comfort and safety: Comfortable hiking boots or other sturdy footwear is recommended. Tell someone where you are going and when you expect to return. Remain on the established trails and obey all signs. Carry a first aid kit. Animals must be leashed at all times and cleaned up after. Dress for the weather. Carry bug repellent, sunscreen, and drinking water. Pack in pack out.

Visitor Services: The office kiosk is open from Victoria Day weekend to Thanksgiving weekend. There are trail maps and park information available at the kiosk. Camping is available for a fee. Please check at the kiosk for availability. There are picnic tables, firepits, and washroom facilities available at the day use parking area.

 

About an hour north of Liverpool, and twenty minutes north of Caledonia, sits 381 square kilometres of protected forest called "Keji" by locals. Kejimkujik National Park and National Historic Site is a outdoor enthusiast's dream, with endless hiking and biking trails giving you views of amazing wildlife and rare species. A popular choice is the Hemlocks and Hardwoods Hike, taking you past majestic Hemlocks, some several hundred years old.  The list of trails and their descriptions is found below.  

Location: Maitland Bridge

Directions: Take exit 19 off of Highway 103 and travel along Highway 8 for about an hour.  The entrance to Kejimkujik is in the community of Maitland Bridge and is well marked with signs.  GPS – Keji Visitor Centre: 44.438667, -65.208449

Dates and rates: Visitor Services open from Victoria Day Weekend to Thanksgiving Weekend.  Visit www.pc.gc.ca for up to date admission fees.

Contact: 902-682-2772

Significant Features: Lakes, rivers, wildlife, Dark Sky Preserve, core of the UNESCO Southwest Nova Biosphere, Mi'kmaw Petroglyphs.

For your comfort and safety: You are responsible for your own safety. Parks Canada staff are ready to help you by assisting you with trip planning, and providing you with current information. Please contact Kejimkujik staff for guidance prior to your visit. Current information regarding changing weather conditions, fire hazards, trail conditions and ongoing maintenance, canoeing conditions, and animal activity is available at the Visitor Centre during open hours. Be prepared, you are in a natural environment. Planning your trip helps to ensure you comfort and safety and allows you to make adjustments in gear, timing, and goals as you flex with changing conditions. Be ready for the unexpected!

Visitor Services: The Visitor Centre is open from Victoria Day weekend to Thanksgiving weekend. During the fall and winter months visitor services will not be offered. Kejimkujik National Park and National Historic Site will still be available for day use activities from sunrise to sunset. Hiking, bird watching and picnicking will continue to be available throughout the fall and winter. If the roads are closed due to severe weather please park at the Visitor Centre parking lot and begin your journey from there. There is no overnight camping or overnight parking available when the Visitor Centre is not open.  Please check the Kejimkujik National Park and Historic Site website for more information.

 

 

 

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